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I Ate a Bowl of Soup, and Now I'm a Muslim

I Ate a Bowl of Soup, and Now I’m a Muslim

By Hussein Rashid, Religion Dispatches
According to them, the fact that Campbell’s Soup Canada is a introducing a series of halal soups is a sign that Muslims are taking over the U.S. and imposing shari’ah to make everyone Muslim. The Revealer has a great series on the (mis)uses of the term shari’ah that points out that there is no one thing called shari’ah, and it does not mean what its popular critics think it means.

Did the First Christians Worship Jesus?: A Review

Did the First Christians Worship Jesus?: A Review

The doctrine of the Trinity, which is the traditional answer to this dilemma is not only baffling to our monotheist friends, but it is a bit baffling to many Christians as well. Words like essence, substance, and even person make little sense outside their Greek philosophical foundations. Whatever theological answers have emerged over time, as Christians have wrestled with and reflected upon the biblical witness, a satisfactory answer to the question of whether worship should be given to Jesus requires us to attend to the New Testament evidence.

Jesus and the Sukkah

Jesus and the Sukkah

By Rob Goodman, Killing the Buddha
As his final earthly act at the end of the Gospel of John, Jesus hosts a cookout. He’s seen at first from a fishing boat, waving from the shore in the gathering dawn, alive after all, yelling for Peter and his crewmates to haul in their nets and come ashore. Once on land—Peter dripping wet after swimming all the way, and the rest dragging the boat—they see that Jesus has already started a little charcoal fire on the ground, grilling fish with bread. Jesus said to them, “Come and have breakfast.”

Year of Living Biblically: A Book Review

Year of Living Biblically: A Book Review

Throughout the year long transformation documented in his book, Jacobs’ life goes from being a secular endeavor to a routine suitable for living a biblical existence. He undergoes such feats as: blowing a rams horn or shofar to signal the start of every month, avoids making any graven images, opting instead for two-dimensional shapes even when he’s playing with his son, refrains from touching all women for fear of their being ‘unclean’ that week, even carries around a chair to ensure he never sits somewhere an ‘unclean’ woman may have, the consulting of a shatnez (mixed fiber) tester to make sure the cloth of what he wears is only made of one kind of fiber, and the adherence to biblical laws about eating which besides providing forbiddance against cheeseburgers, also lead to the tasting of a cricket.

Religion In The Supreme Court (Part II)

Religion In The Supreme Court (Part II)

Since I wrote that article, President Obama has nominated current Solicitor General Elena Kagan to replace the retiring Justice John Paul Stevens. If Kagan is confirmed by the Senate, she will be the eighth Jewish Justice and the third Jewish member of the current Court. Significantly, Kagan’s confirmation would bring with it something that has never occurred in the history of this country – a “Protestant-less” Court. Assuming Kagan is confirmed, the Court will soon be comprised of six Catholics and three Jews, religious groups that make up only around twenty four and two percent of the country’s population, respectively.

Religion In The Supreme Court (Part I)

Religion In The Supreme Court (Part I)

Many have called on President Obama to replace Justice Stevens with a fellow Protestant, thereby creating a so-called “Protestant seat,” to go along with the “African American seat” and the “Jewish seat” already in existence. There is a significant chance that Justice Stevens will be replaced with a non-Protestant, thereby creating a “Protestant-less” Supreme Court for the first time in American history. This is particularly striking considering that, according to a survey conducted by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life in 2007,

Remembering The Holocaust

Remembering The Holocaust

“How does the Jewish world community deal with this inevitable and pressing challenge to remember after there are no more survivors of the actual events but only eyewitnesses to the eyewitnesses?” Berenbaum spoke of how Jewish communities were “obligated to remember and had an obligation to remember how to remember.”

Easter – Christian, Jewish, Pagan?

Easter – Christian, Jewish, Pagan?

Easter (Pascha in Greek and Latin) is arguably the most important feast in the Christian liturgical year yet the modern Easter celebration is often associated with Jewish Passover as well as pagan imagery and deities. Is the modern Easter feast a purely Christian one or is there legitimacy in viewing Easter as a product of religious syncretism?