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Disenchantment and Re-enchantment on eBay

Disenchantment and Re-enchantment on eBay

By Joseph Laycock….
On August 30, eBay officially discontinued the sale of “metaphysical” goods and services on its online market. Spells and divination services have been available on eBay since the site’s inception in 1995. Before Thursday, eBay shoppers could select from more than 40,000 spell listings and 15,000 offers of tarot card readings. The new policy has put an entire class of online magicians, fortune-tellers and potion-brewers out of business. Some claim to be sincere practitioners while others have admitted to being frauds. Many have sought to relocate their shop to Craigslist and other parts of the online marketplace.

Creatures of the Night: In Search of Ghosts, Vampires, Werewolves, and Demons by Dr. Gregory L. Reece

Creatures of the Night: In Search of Ghosts, Vampires, Werewolves, and Demons by Dr. Gregory L. Reece

Kate Daley-Bailey
Before sparkly vampires like Edward Cullen, before Count Orlok of Nosferatu, even before Bram Stoker’s classic tale of Dracula, there were the vampire tales of European folklore. As Reece suggests, these early prototypes of the vampire are far-less glamorous that the stylized, Gothic vampires of Polidori, Le Fanu, and Stoker. They attack cattle as well as humans, resemble bloated ticks when exhumed, and they more physically favor our conception of a zombie than the modern day vampire. Not only does Reece present a thorough but enjoyable romp through the history of the vampire, he also explores research about various real-life vampire communities, such as work done by Joseph Laycock in Vampires Today: The Truth about Modern Vampires. Perhaps the most fascinating chapter in Reece’s book, according to this reviewer, is his chapter on werewolves, a chapter which plays upon the concepts presented in folktales made familiar by The Brothers Grimm, Perrault, and Paul DeLarue.

The Vampire Who Beat Wells Fargo

The Vampire Who Beat Wells Fargo

By Joseph Laycock….
But there’s another element to the story: Rodgers openly identifies as a vampire. The media’s celebration of a vampire “folk hero” is an important historical moment for this emerging community and may be a curious statement about tolerance in a time when trust is in scarce supply.
A music and events promoter by trade, Rodgers started Philadelphia’s “Dracula Ball” sixteen years ago, which has since become one of the largest events for goths and vampires in the country. Rodgers identifies as a “pranic vampire” meaning that he nourishes himself on the vital energy of others, and he’s had fangs permanently installed, which he describes as “an extension and expression of myself.”